How to delete a file without having to empty the trash

— How to delete a file without having to empty the trash —

You know that things you put into the trash aren’t really gone until you empty the trash, right? Turns out that in 10.11.x (El Capitan) you can throw something way and have it be deleted immediately if you want. Just click on the item you want to delete, then go to File/Move to Trash… except hold the Option key down while you do it, and you’ll see “Delete Immediately…”

Delete Immediately with the Option Key

Delete Immediately with the Option Key


You’ll still have to deal with a dialog box:
Are you sure you want to delete immediately?

Are you sure you want to delete immediately?

Keyboard Junkies: you know that Command-Delete (or Command-Backspace) sends the selected item to the Trash. So, if you hold the Option key while you do it (Command-Option-Delete) the items will be “Immediately Deleted.” Very fast– but then you have to deal with the “Are you sure” dialog box. Bonus Hint: use Command-D to click the “Delete” button in that box from the keyboard. Command-Option-Delete, then Command-D, takes care of everything.

How to Open winmail.dat Files on a Mac

TNEF's Enough icon

TNEF’s Enough

— How to Open winmail.dat Files on a Mac —

Sometimes you get an email with an attachment called “winmail.dat.” You’re never able to open it– unless you use Josh Jacobs’ excellent “TNEF’s Enough” program. It’s available on the Mac App Store for free via this link.

Easiest way to use it: put TNEF’s Enough into your Dock, then drag winmail.dat files from your email program to the TNEF’s Enough icon. The rest you’ll figure out.

TNEF’s Enough allows Macs to read and extract files from Microsoft TNEF stream files. The files are usually received by SMTP based e-mail programs from Microsoft Exchange and Microsoft Outlook users. The SMTP based e-mail program will usually receive either a MIME attachment named “winmail.dat” or a MIME attachment with the type “application/ms-tnef.”

The file is a rich text (or MAPI) message that is sent from Outlook to Exchange. When Exchange sends the message to an outside server it writes the MAPI message as a MIME attachment. The unfortunate side effect of this plan is if the Outlook user has someone in their address book as a person who can receive “Rich Text” then the user will receive the TNEF file whether the user uses Outlook or not.

The app is free, but you can donate to the developer if you’d like to, and considering how much trouble TNEF’s Enough saves us, I think we all should do it. See this web page for more information.

How to Make Photos App Quit Launching When You Connect Your iPhone

— How to Make Photos App Quit Launching When You Connect Your iPhone —

If you don’t want the Photos app to launch every time you connect your iPhone all you have to do is uncheck one little box in the Photos app. Note that this setting is per device– you can uncheck the box for one device and leave it checked for another.

Checkbox controlling whether Photos will launch or not

Checkbox controlling whether Photos will launch or not


Activate 1Password from the Keyboard

— Activate 1Password from the Keyboard —

1Password is the best password manager for the Mac. (It synchronizes with the iPhone and iPad too, so your passwords are always up to date.) Most people access their passwords by clicking the 1Password button on the toolbar in Safari, Firefox, or Chrome, but that’s the slow way to go.

The fast way: Command-\.

Command-\

Command-\


This pops open the 1Password “Unlock” box if 1Password is locked, and after you enter your master password and hit Return, 1Password automatically pops in the username and password you need for the website you’re on.
1Password Unlock dialog box

1Password Unlock dialog box


If 1Password is already unlocked, Command-\ fills in the username and password without you doing anything more.

Try it once and you’ll be hooked.

Not using 1Password yet? Read this article for more information.

Delete Conversations in Messages from the Keyboard

— Delete Conversations in Messages from the Keyboard —

You may have tried pressing Delete or Backspace or even the forward delete key to delete a conversation in Messages. If you’ve tried, you know they don’t work. What does work is to hold the Command key down while pressing Delete or Backspace (forward delete won’t work).

If you select a conversation (see below) and then press Command-Delete (or Backspace– depends on what your keyboard calls it) you’ll get a message asking whether you’re sure you want to delete the conversation.

Dialog box in Messages on a Mac, asking whether one wants to delete a conversation

Are you sure you want to delete this conversation?


BONUS: skip the confirmation dialog box by adding the Option key to the mix. Command-Option-Delete (or Backspace) deletes the conversation without asking whether you’re sure. So be sure!